Mississippi Map

Grand Gulf - Raymond Scenic Byway

Basics
Length:
50 miles (80 km)
Time:
2 hours

Description

Visitors come to this byway for a leisurely step back in time among an enjoyable atmosphere. Delve into Mississippi's history, explore the lush countryside, or imagine men in arms as they marched along the byway years ago. The fifty-mile byway stretches from northern Claiborne County all the way to western Hinds County and offers a fresh look at an environment untouched by modern development.

Begin your sightseeing in Port Gibson at the Grand Gulf Military Monument along Back Grand-Gulf Road. Port Gibson stands as one of Mississippi's oldest remaining towns to have withstood the impacts of the Civil War. The town's Grand Gulf Military Park includes important artifacts from Civil War battles including muskets, uniforms, and cannonballs. The park can help gaining a better perspective of why this byway is so historically significant.

As the byway continues through Mississippi it ends in Raymond. Once devastated by the Civil War, Raymond is now an informational area to learn about a crucial part of America's history. Watch Civil War reenactments or visit the area where the Battle of Raymond took place. Trace your heritage and learn of the many challenges that settlers, Indians, and missionaries faced. Raymond offers a two-week Annual Pilgrimage that visits the Hinds County Courthouse, historic homes in the community, and the Raymond Cemetery.

Tourism Resources

Attractions

Points of Interest

Points of Interest Along The Way

Delta National Forest (MS)

The Delta National Forest consists of over 60,000 acres of marshy wetlands in Mississippi. The forest plays an important role in protecting the American Waterfowl by providing an area for the birds to reside and migrate.

Directions

In Port Gibson, go north on U.S. 61 to Vicksburg, then north on SR 3.

Homochitto National Forest (MS)

The Homochitto purchase unit was established in 1936 as the first National Forest in Mississippi. The Forest was named for the Homochitto River, an Indian name for Big Red River. France, England, Spain, and the United States strongly influenced the area of land around what is now the Homochitto National Forest. It operated as a single district until 1952, then was divided into two Ranger Districts, the Bude and the Homochitto.

The Forest, consisting of approximately 189,000 acres, hosts a number of resources. The Homochitto is one of the leading timber-producing National Forests in the South. For nearly 50 years, exploration for oil and gas has taken place on this Forest. About 86 percent of the producing wells on National Forest land in Mississippi come from the Homochitto.

Directions

From Port Gibson, take U.S. 61 south, then SR 28 east.

Details

Length:
50 miles (80 km)
Time:
2 hours
Main Roads:
MS-18 E

Map + Directions

Customizable Directions


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